Category Archive Personnel Development

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If the boss is the problem – and how I/O psychologists may help

Poor management, a lack of conflict, error and criticism culture can cost a company dearly. Due to the shortage of skilled workers, demographic developments and digitalization, the demand for services related to mental health at the workplace are increasing more and more. I/O psychologists (Industrial and Organizational Psychology), for example, are valuable support for organizations. But exactly this is their job and what are their strengths?

For a long time, the mental health of employees has received little attention. With the increasing density of work, ever higher demands and increasing burdens due to digital availability, mental health has also been the focus of attention for a few years now. By 2018, German health insurers had reported an ever-increasing number of cases of mental illness. They are now the most common cause of early retirement and occupational disability in Germany and, with 15.2 percent, are still the third most common cause of absenteeism. Poor leadership, a lack of conflict, error and criticism culture are sooner or later a business-critical issue that can endanger the continued existence of the organization. Above all, people can be overloaded to the point of burnout if they are only supposed to function on the factual level during change processes and are not heard. Fears, emotions and internal and external conflicts are still far too rarely discussed.

Looking behind the façade and promoting healthy cooperation

Unlike psychotherapists, I/O psychologists are not clinicians but analyze an organization and its actors at all hierarchical levels from a socio-psychological perspective. They look behind the façade of a company and analyze social relationships and interactions. How do individual people feel when, for example, they constantly experience themselves in change situations as a result of digitalization? To what extent do the demands and reality of a company’s social dealings soften and how does this affect the perception and behavior of employees? How does a manager lead and communicate? Are emotional needs addressed in communication in addition to factual issues, especially in change situations? And how does a company deal with conflicts, mistakes, and fears? Does a manager then also address the relationship levels between conflict parties and works up disturbed relationships in such a way that it can then continue on a healthy working level? I/O psychologists need a pronounced communicative and social competence. They must ask the right questions and above all be able to listen. They must moderate conversations and be emphatic and sympathetic to people of all hierarchies. Above all, they must impart knowledge and methods on how healthy cooperation in companies, departments or teams should and can be successful.

High qualification requirements for I/O psychologists

Ambitious providers recruit only graduates of a diploma or master’s degree course in psychology. In Germany, the subject has a numerus clause of 1.0. Other courses of study in psychology often do not fulfill the specialist and methodological knowledge that is ideally available. One recognizes quality providers by the fact that they submit enterprises no run-of-the-mill-offers, instead these can clarify beforehand, where the pain points are, what the enterprise needs and expects as purposeful solutions. Even though there are only a few legal requirements for I/O psychologists, large providers also attach great importance to the qualification of their colleagues along with the methodological and technical developments in corporate psychology research and practice.

Interdisciplinary cooperation

In 2013, the German legislator also recognized that mental health is a high value in a modern, synchronized and digitalized working world with increasingly older employees. It, therefore, included a guideline in the Occupational Health and Safety Act that all employers, regardless of the size of their company, must regularly carry out a risk analysis of psychological stress at the workplace. However, the guidelines for the implementation of the “Joint German Occupational Safety and Health Strategy” do not stipulate that such risk analysis must be prepared by psychologists. For example, at AMD TÜV it has been agreed that the psychologists will be in charge of the process, will advise on the methodology and will play a key role in supporting communication. Occupational physicians and safety specialists must also be involved. The cooperation in prevention teams with occupational medicine, occupational health and safety, occupational health promotion and occupational integration management is necessary in order to deal with the complex issues relating to occupational health and safety in companies.

TÜV Rheinland Academy Digital Competence

How TÜV Rheinland Academy empowers digital competence

How do I move safely on the net? How do I recognize a fake profile? How do I judge online communication, how do I distinguish real news from fake news? What is a Meme? Where do I reveal too much of my private life and become a potential victim of identity theft? These are all questions of digital literacy to which children and young people should have an answer. This makes them strong and resistant to the dangers of the internet and prepares them for their professional future. So far, however, digital competence is neither a teaching subject nor part of teacher training in Germany. TÜV Rheinland Academy in Germany is changing this – for example as a partner of DigiCamps. The resonance is unprecedented and has in the meantime the format of a movement, better said in the net speech: DigiCamps goes viral. The aim is to enable the specialists and managers of tomorrow to develop safely and healthily and to start here as early as possible: with schools and teachers.

2017 was the start of “DigiCamps – Life in Balance.” Since then, a republic-wide series has emerged that provides students, teachers, and parents with orientation on the World Wide Web. To provide didactically and pedagogically valuable information about the opportunities and risks of using the internet the social enterprise BG 3000 Service GmbH, the health insurance BARMER and TÜV Rheinland Academy Germany developed smart camps, teacher camps, trainee camps, and DigiCamps. Barmer is sponsoring the initiative, TÜV Rheinland Academy is one of the leading competence developers on board as part of the digital transformation. The primary motivation is that the acquisition of digital competence has to start early. Today and even more in the future, it belongs to the essential teaching contents such as reading, writing, and arithmetic. Parents and teachers must not be left alone with this task.

Optimizing the digital self and avoiding digital stress

A DigiCamp lasts three days and has a modular structure. It is aimed at students, mainly middle school students, teachers, and parents. In interactive workshops, they learn the safe and above all good use of digital media. The trainer teams consist of media educators, psychologists, nutrition and fitness experts and, above all, well-known social media influencers. Together, the participants deal with all facets of internet use. Questions about the functioning of Snapchat, Instagram, etc. are dealt with. The participants deal with the individual challenge of how to optimize their online self. They learn how to recognize addictive behavior in themselves and others and how to handle digital stress. By dealing with their usage patterns and without moral forefinger, the DigiCamps provide recommendations and orientation. Social media and mobile devices are part of life, but good use of them needs to be learned.

Hackers create “aha” effects

The DigiCamps start with impressive demonstrations that IT security specialists prepare according to age. With live hacking experiments, adults and teenagers will experience how quickly an e-mail account with weak passwords can be hacked. They are amazed when they experience the consequences of a travel ticket posted on Facebook and a thumbs up. A thumb recorded with an ordinary smartphone camera can be used to manipulate the fingerprint sensor on a mobile device. These “aha” effects about an unconsidered posting of personal information have a healing effect. Those who have participated in the DigiCamp will at least question their user behavior and ultimately change it.

Influencers clarify

Educating in the best sense of the word is also done by social media giants at the DigiCamps, who have tens of thousands of subscribers on Instagram or YouTube. For example, Irina Engelke (287,000 followers) and Laura Grosch (132,000 followers) report on their Instagram channels during the DigiCamps. Sebastian Meichsner from Bullshit TV, among others, will talk about their YouTube projects with over 1.8 million followers.

Influencers of this kind, who are still in adolescence themselves, inform their peers about the mechanisms of action of these popular platforms. In the workshops, they appeal to their practical experience to use their minds in dealing with social media. Under their guidance and accompanied by pedagogues, the participants on the second and third day create their videos, create blogs, or other digital formats. They also deal with conditions of production and reception. In this way, children and young people learn playfully and concretely how to deal responsibly with these media.

Great interest in the format also from third parties

By the end of 2019, DigiCamps should have taken place in at least 100 schools. The objective of the project is that the teaching staff will then be able to offer their own teaching formats for digital competence in their schools with the extensive teaching materials of the initiative. In the meantime, word of success has spread, and the unique role played by TÜV Rheinland Academy in the interdisciplinary project has become known. Further organizations in Germany and Switzerland are interested in the realization of DigiCamps at schools and with education providers.

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Skilled Worker of India are going to come to Germany

Skilled workers from all over the world: Recruiting made easy for companies

There is a shortage of skilled workers in Germany. The lack already leads to sales losses in many companies. This is why TÜV Rheinland Academy has developed a practice-oriented model with which it is possible to recruit qualified specialists from all over the world on time. The first automotive mechatronics technicians to work at Hyundai dealers in Germany will be coming from India these days. TÜV Rheinland Academy takes over everything that burdens companies. How does the process work?

Hardly any medium-sized company or group is satisfied with the recruitment of skilled workers in Germany. Depending on the study, up to 450,000 well-trained specialists are lacking each year, mainly in the STEM subjects, i.e., Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

Since other countries in the world are much more consistent in their qualification of STEM, international recruiting is a sensible way for industries and companies to cover the shortage of specialists and to match demand and need perfectly. If only it weren’t for the lack of contacts to suitable applicants, the language barriers, and the associated bureaucracy to allow international specialists to enter the country. Just thinking about it might make some HR departments feel overwhelmed. Even though the law on the immigration of skilled workers has lowered some hurdles, specialized know-how is needed to organize the legal prerequisites for the migration of immigrants into the local labor market.

TÜV Rheinland Academy has now developed a model with which companies can meet their demand for skilled workers in a targeted and timely manner – without having to worry about the associated formalities and the sophisticated recruitment and qualification process – to overcome precisely these hurdles. Above all, they can be sure that the new employees actually meet the desired requirement profile.

The Academy is currently running pilot projects with various partners from the motor vehicle sector. The initial pilot project was launched at the beginning of 2019 to meet the demand for automotive mechatronics technicians at Hyundai Motor Deutschland GmbH. By 2022, TÜV Rheinland Academy is to recruit up to 250 specialists in India. The first 100 have already been won and are currently being prepared with their local colleagues for their deployment in Germany. The new employees commit themselves for at least 36 months. If an employee is absent prematurely, TÜV Rheinland Academy will fill the position again.

Good qualification and motivation
With the new model, the client benefits from the expertise of TÜV Rheinland Academy in the area of competence development and from the internationality of TÜV Rheinland Academy in more than 26 countries. Cooperation within the TÜV Rheinland Group begins with a competent local recruitment process and continues through to integration management in Germany.
In the current case, the Indian branch of TÜV Rheinland Academy identifies suitable candidates on the basis of the requirements profile drawn up by the client. In India, for example, there are seven university degrees that are comparable to the occupational profile and competence profile of the local mechatronics technician. The shortlist will include applicants who speak excellent English and have at least two years of practical work experience. Together with the client’s personnel, TÜV Rheinland Academy conducts the first interviews with applicants. Besides, the candidates are thoroughly prepared both linguistically and technically for the future requirements in Germany. Via language schools and in future also by means of virtual language training, they acquire language level A2 with a certificate and take the B1 examination in the first three months after arrival and are further qualified to B2 if required.
If there is a need for further professional training, the specialists to be placed are trained in the contents by TÜV Rheinland Academy with online learning that has been tried and tested over many years. The complete materials of the dual German vocational training as a mechatronics technician form the basis.

Complex procedures for professional recognition and entry
Once the mechatronics engineers have signed their employment contract, the TÜV Rheinland Academy team in India will continue to guide them through the process. Among other things, it prepares them thoroughly for the cultural and labor law conditions in Germany – supported by the team of TÜV Rheinland Academy in Germany. The German colleagues take care of the recognition of the Indian qualification certificates in this case and the residence regulations. TÜV Rheinland Academy has agreed with the Cologne Chamber of Crafts (HWK) on a procedure for the examination of certificates so that formal recognition by the decentralized HWK can take place quickly. Visas and other proofs, according to the recently passed law on the immigration of skilled workers complete the preparation for entry. By the time the plane takes off for Germany, around 30 documents per person will have to be processed, partially translated, and certified. This effort has already been standardized to such an extent that TÜV Rheinland Academy will be able to bring numerous specialists to Germany every month in the future if required.

It is still a pilot project, but it is starting off so promisingly that it will be extended to other countries in the international TÜV Rheinland network as well as other technical professions and sectors. Numerous other companies from medium-sized businesses and industry have already expressed a great deal of interest. Soon we will report on the progress of this project – the best thing is to come back soon.

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New Work: From profession to competence

If you’re going to remain competitive in the labor market, you have to develop your competencies. If you want to monetize your workforce, you have to be flexible and willing to learn. Hardly anyone works his whole life in the same profession. This applies to both companies and employees. In the USA, sometimes competencies are already more important than the vocational qualification once acquired. Is that the future?

The ever shorter half-life of once obtained knowledge has been further shortened with the advent of the computer, rationalization, and automation. Since the 1980s,  it has become increasingly clear that lifelong learning is essential in many occupations. The professional idea, which is based on having undergone a clearly defined education and which has since developed further through real on-the-job training, is becoming more and more defensive. Today, the profession is at best an entrance ticket to the foyer of professional life, which after a few years is hardly suitable as a ticket for the next levels of the career ladder.

New Work in the Age of Digitalization

In the developed economies of the West, further development of the professional idea can already be observed in the nineties. In the USA, labor market researchers and labor ministers such as Robert Reich already recognized in the first Clinton Administration since 1993 that the dependent middle class needed access to the labor market even without a university degree. Inspired by the theses of “New Work”, which the Austrian-American social philosopher Frithjof Bergman founded in the 1980s, employment and education programs were developed that no longer addressed the deficits of the rural unemployed, but rather the existing competence that needed to be developed. Starting from the thesis, which has been refuted today, that the job system is at its end, the freedom of action and independence of people beyond gainful employment must be promoted. After the New Work was discussed a dozen times up and down, the term is now experiencing a renaissance with digitalization, but with different signs. Again, the motive is to open access to the labor market to a detached “working class”. Unlike Bergman, however, it is not a question of the emancipation of the former industrial workers in the “Rust Belt”, as the Democrats call them “White Trash”. Rather, it is digitization and the shortage of skilled workers and the associated lack of digital skills in companies that have led to the emergence of new qualification programs in the USA.

TechHire relies on competencies beyond formal qualification

If you can do the job, you should get the job: Since 2015, the social enterprise TechHire has been expanding in the USA, operating over 200 training facilities in 72 municipalities in social partnership with 1,300 employers. The model is similar to a dual training program according to the German model. The experts use online entrance tests to identify competencies and interests. Discussions with potential employers follow this. After a few months of all-day training, the participants complete an internship in a company. A wide variety of local TechHire companies specialize in qualifications in technology industries. Specifically, they have improved matching between job seekers, employers, teachers, policy-makers and local training groups: the online tool “training finder“, developed by LinkedIn’s business network, links relevant information on competence profiles and income opportunities, skills required, training programs and vacancies for different job advertisements.

Thus even applicants who do not formally have any qualifications, but who have acquired competencies even in self-study, have a chance to specifically promote them in order to get them into jobs. Autodidacts, for example, who work on computers in their spare time also have a chance to get a job as a software tester with 40,000 dollars after a qualification. TechHire’s competence-oriented approach has already enabled companies to fill 4,000 vacancies that would otherwise remain vacant today.

Conclusion: Competence development creates a vocation

TechHire and its partners have thus managed in an unbureaucratic and, above all, intelligent way to make a contribution to reducing the shortage of skilled workers in companies and to imparting new individual perspectives to people by promoting competencies. A mission to which TÜV Rheinland Academy has committed itself, particularly in the field of technical professions. Digitalization is constantly creating new requirement profiles for which it is necessary to establish appropriate competence models that enable people and organizations to remain capable of action and to actively shape both the present and the future. Artificial intelligence, digitization and automation will create many new jobs that will have to be taken over by today’s “skilled workers”. The way there is competence development on the job, actively supported by companies that have recognized the value of lifelong learning. It is also important to lay the right foundations in the field of initial vocational training for young people and to start thinking about tomorrow’s requirements today. Application cases of TÜV Rheinland Academy, which as a partner supports governments in various countries worldwide in establishing competence development via the dual training system according to the German model, close the technical education gap between state schools and degrees and the requirements of the industry. In this way, people and companies are actively enabled to master the challenges of digital transformation. In individual cases, personnel certifications ensure that competencies are always up to date and ensure a uniform quality level of the employees in the company.

 

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OTSecurityProfessional; TÜV Rheinland

New certification initiative to increase safety of industrial plants

Hackers are increasingly attacking operational technology systems in industrial plants. These systems detect physical effects or control motors, pumps or valves in industrial system. These systems are increasingly connected to the Internet in order to improve efficiency or help gain a competitive edge. These systems or  components may have vulnerabilities that can be exploited by cyber-attacks. As  cybersecurity knowledge and skills in this domain are lacking TÜV Rheinland has developed the “Certified Operational Technology Cybersecurity Professional (TÜV)” certification program, which supports companies in identifying and improving team skills and thus increasing the overall cybersecurity of industrial and operational technology facilities.

The Triton malware attack reported in December 2017 was the first publicly documented cyber-attack on an industrial control infrastructure (ICS) designed to interfere with the operation of a Safety Instrumented System (SIS) used to protect an industrial plant as a fail safe against fire or explosion. According to experts, this incident was an urgent warning that attackers with geopolitical motives are now targeting security-critical systems.

The aim of attacks is usually to obtain intellectual property, trade secrets and technical information but many companies are unaware of the dangers cyber-attacks pose to their plants. In addition, their controls for cybersecurity are usually not tailored to the protection of OT systems. According to the new study “Industrial Security in 2019: A TÜV Rheinland Perspective“, 40 percent of respondents say they have never investigated the risks posed by cyber-attacks on industrial plants. A further 34 percent do not know whether their own company has ever investigated these risks. In addition, only one in five companies has tailored its cybersecurity measures specifically to industrial or OT facilities. This is alarming, as attacks from the network can shut down entire plants. This leads to production losses with high consequential costs and, in the case of critical infrastructures, can also have an impact on the overall security of supply and the smooth operation of modern society.

If production facilities or critical infrastructures – such as those of energy suppliers – are networked, this offers additional targets for cyber-attacks. Almost 70 percent of the respondents to the survey came from the manufacturing industry; in addition, the automotive industry, logistics companies, the oil and gas industry, public institutions as well as the telecommunications, energy and chemical industries were represented. The aim of the study was to better understand how companies detect and take protective measures against cyber-attacks. Because traditional knowledge in the field of cybersecurity is often not sufficient to meet the complex requirements of the industrial, networked world, TÜV Rheinland has developed this new certification for experts in the field of industrial cybersecurity.

More quality for the industry

With the new personal certification, TÜV Rheinland is responding to the increasing demand from specialists. In such a complex area as cybersecurity, a certification program from a neutral third party such as TÜV Rheinland can help to align companies’ expertise with the requirements of industrial cybersecurity and further professionalize industrial companies in this area.

The certification program actively evaluates candidates through a combination of professional career review, interview and technical review. Participants must have at least ten years’ experience in cybersecurity, including five years in a leadership role. The candidates prepare a case study as part of the examination. After a critical review by TÜV Rheinland experts, they will be invited to an online presentation and technical question and answer session. Experts who meet the standard receive a certificate from TÜV Rheinland and can use the title “Certified Operational Technology Cybersecurity Professional (TÜV)”. Re-certification by TÜV Rheinland is required every three years. Further information on the program can be found at:
www.tuv.com/en/otcybersecurityprofessional.

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Where do most artificial intelligence professionals work?

In general, Artificial Intelligence (AI) refers to the attempt to reproduce certain human decision-making structures, e.g. by building and programming a computer in such a way that it can work on problems relatively independently. Often, however, this also refers to imitated intelligence, whereby “intelligent behavior” is to be simulated using mostly simple algorithms, for example in computer games. The understanding of the term artificial intelligence often reflects the enlightenment idea of “man as machine”, the imitation of which is aimed at the so-called strong AI: to create an intelligence that is to mechanize human thinking,[1] or to construct and build a machine that reacts intelligently or behaves like a human being. (Source: Wikipedia) But even artificial intelligence cannot get far without humans. According to a survey on LinkedIn, the USA has the highest number of Artificial Intelligence (AI) experts in the world.

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Why personnel certifications are more important than ever today

A highly engineered and networked society requires the actors to continuously acquire up-to-date knowledge and skills. Fewer and fewer people today are still in a position to survey the current key competencies within an industry, let alone across industries. This is a situation that everyone knows who decides to buy a car or a more complex electrical appliance. More and more consumers are turning to the test reports of TÜV or test portals before buying in order to orient themselves and evaluate the differences between manufacturers. In the field of professional training, the certification of individuals plays a similar role. What it can do and what to look out for when selecting providers.

The professional training market is characterized by a hardly manageable diversity of more or less well-known or unknown training providers and certifiers. They all issue certificates about the success of their participants in their advanced training courses, which are called certificates, diploma, attendance certificates, etc.. Independent personnel certification bodies such as PersCert TÜV use standardized and transparent test procedures based on internationally stringent standards to determine whether people possess specific knowledge and skills. If these can be objectively established, the personnel certification body shall issue a final certificate. These final certificates do not have unlimited validity, but are renewed after a recertification procedure. The prerequisite for recertification is that the certified person keeps his or her knowledge up to date.

Why personnel certification is worthwhile for both employees and companies

Various occupational groups can be tested and certified. TÜV Rheinland, for example, offers certified qualifications in the areas of production and technology, quality, sustainability, occupational safety and environmental protection, energy, IT and data protection, health services, security, services and sales. With success: Every year, around 30,000 people make use of the more than 750 certification programs of the independent and accredited certification body PersCert TÜV. For a good reason. Employees benefit in many ways:

  • Opportunities for specialization: Personnel certificates make it possible to specialize in a targeted manner, to design one’s own career path to fit precisely and to get step by step closer to one’s dream job.
  • Door opener for attractive jobs: Personnel certificates are a seal of quality.
  • Improved career prospects: Personnel certificates not only illustrate the skills and competencies that a person possesses, they also demonstrate commitment and thus provide important arguments for the next step on the career ladder.

But it is also worthwhile for companies to invest in the personnel certification of their own employees. For the following reasons, among others:

  • Uniform service and production standards
    Personnel certifications help to establish uniform standards throughout the company. In production as well as in quality management.
  • Improved competitive opportunities
    Personnel certifications contribute to improved competitiveness. Customers and partners know that they can rely on the expertise of the employees.
  • International Recognition
    Personnel certification procedures based on DIN EN ISO/IEC 17024 are recognized worldwide. This makes certificates globally comprehensible and comparable. You can make it clear to business partners and customers that your employees are well trained in terms of their competencies. Because personnel certifications by PersCert TÜV are subject to the quality standards “Made in Germany”.
  • Targeted personnel development
    Personnel certifications are a first-class tool in the fight against the increasing shortage of skilled workers.
  • Motivated employees
    With personnel certificates you enable your employees to sharpen their own professional profile in a targeted manner. This contributes to their motivation and increases employee loyalty.

What should be considered when selecting a personnel certification body?

(1) The status of a participant’s certification should be publicly documented and should be available to interested parties for consultation at any time. In this way, doubts about the authenticity of a certificate or its content can be dispelled at any time. At PersCert TÜV, for example, the personnel certificates are documented and available for inspection at www.certipedia.com.

(2) The personnel certification should be carried out according to DIN EN ISO/IEC 17024, as is the case with PersCert TÜV. The DIN EN ISO/IEC 17024 standard specifies internationally recognized requirements for a certification body. It is thus the basis for the high recognition of the certificates in business and administration.

Conclusion: In order to master the rapid progress in an ever more complex world, professional competencies are required. It is essential to know what knowledge and skills these qualifications actually comprise. Ultimately, this scope is decisive for the quality of results of services or products that customers of companies and organizations expect from individuals. Personnel certification makes the scope and timeliness of knowledge measurable. Learn more.

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How XR boosts technical competence

So-called XR technologies are enjoying great popularity in education. After all, Extended Reality (XR) can be used to convey a wide variety of learning content in an extremely practice-oriented way. But how does this actually work? An overview.

Try it. It’s about studying: That’s why flight simulators have been around for almost as long as the aircraft itself. The first were built more than a hundred years ago and consisted of mobile platforms that could be used to simulate the most important flight movements. A seat, a joystick, a few ball joints: these were the beginnings of pilot training.

Immerse yourself in virtual learning worlds
Today, on the other hand, the first dry runs for young pilots feel much more realistic – not least because airlines are increasingly relying on so-called XR technologies for pilot training. XR stands for Extended Reality and combines different virtual technologies under one roof. In modern flight simulators, for example, virtual reality tools play a major role. This allows challenging situations such as storms or engine failures to be simulated realistically. The advantage: Those who have already familiarized themselves with the imponderables of airspace in a flight simulator will be much more familiar with the first real cross-country flights. To make such realistic experiences possible on the ground, you only need two things: VR glasses and a computer program that generates the desired environment. When the user puts on the VR glasses, he can immerse himself in this artificially generated environment and move freely in it virtually. In contrast to a film or video game, it is no longer an observer, but part of the scenery.

Augmented Reality (AR): adding information to the real world
While VR technologies enable immersion in virtual worlds, augmented reality (AR) enriches reality with artificial elements. In concrete terms, this means that users remain in the real world, where they can perceive not only real information, but also computer-generated information or content. In other words: VR technologies put the user in a virtual environment. AR, on the other hand, brings virtual objects into the real world.

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AR technologies are also used for training purposes. For example, trainees with special glasses can safely work on virtual welding objects, as it is already the case with the training at TÜV Rheinland Academy. With the help of TÜV Rheinland, RWE Power has also simplified training for maintenance work on bucket wheel excavators and other heavy equipment using XR technologies – and can thus relieve operators of large equipment. To this end, maintenance personnel are trained via data goggles so that they can perform their tasks safely for people and the environment and effectively – even if their last assignment was a few months ago. Different levers and switches are visualized through the glasses in the form of holograms, functions of the switching elements in the driver’s cab are explained in detail, work processes are explained step by step. The application is not faded in statically in the image field, but blends seamlessly into the real environment. In the case of RWE, this means that the training of maintenance personnel not only takes place in the “classroom”, but also on the heavy equipment itself. The application, developed by TÜV Rheinland’s Digital Learning team, detects the shovel excavator’s driver’s cab and positions the hologram of each control element exactly where it should be. This enables maintenance personnel to find all the necessary levers and switches in no time at all and to apply the practical knowledge acquired by AR in practice without any problems.

XR – an important trend in the teaching of technical skills
It is not for nothing that XR technologies are regarded as an important future trend in the education sector. They pave the way for location-independent and thus cost-effective training courses, are much more fun than conventional training courses and – most importantly – ensure that the practical transfer of theoretical learning content is successful. Accordingly, TÜV Rheinland Academy is currently consistently expanding its range of XR training solutions, for example in the area of forklift driving licenses or in the area of mobility and engineering. As the Chinese philosopher Confucius says: “Tell me and I will forget, show me and I may remember; involve me and I will understand

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In 48 hours to more employee health

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), stress is one of the greatest health threats of the 21st century. It can hit anyone and cause massive mental and physical problems. For this reason alone, employers should find the right way to deal with stress in the workplace early on and consistently, and support employees as needed. Find out how well this works.

Psychological stress at the workplace is increasing. As a result, the health insurance funds in Germany alone have been recording a steady increase in stress-related sick leave for years. Of about 15 days of absence per capita and year, an average of 2.5 days are currently spent on psychological complaints. According to a recent survey, one in five workers across Europe is under stress every day and one in three is thinking about moving to a less stressful job.

Stress costs the economy billions

Mental illnesses also cost the economy dearly. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the economic costs of mental illness in the European Union (EU) alone amount to around 600 billion Euros annually. Especially since many countries now even prescribe the risk assessment of psychological stress at the workplace by law. Workplace health management therefore pays off for companies in every respect. But not every professional requirement is detrimental to health. Thus, stress in moderation can also encourage higher performance, promote personal development and give positive impulses for the quality of life and work. It is therefore crucial for companies to recognize at an early stage what strains have negative impacts on the workforce and its motivation.

Facts decide

But how can well-founded insights be gained beyond the subjective statements of employees? With the Resilience Check, TÜV Rheinland for the first time offers a program that objectifies the subjectively felt physical and mental stress of employees on the basis of reliable measured values – from heart health to sleep quality and recovery to general fitness. The resilience check provides companies with an instrument for realistically assessing the physical effects of stress on the workforce – and initiating long-term, needs-based preventive measures. This makes it a useful addition to risk assessment and becomes a valuable element of occupational health and safety and health management.

Determine individual stress factors

On the one hand, the individual employee benefits. After the online questionnaire on the physical condition (e.g. high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, sleep quality) and psychological condition (work-related behavior and experience pattern) in the context of their work has been completed, a chest strap measurement is carried out. On two ideal working days, different vital data on heart health, sleep quality, stress and physical activity are measured using a sensor that is attached to the skin like a plaster under the breast. A personal health report is automatically delivered at the end of the measurement. On the other hand, the company receives an anonymous company report for the targeted planning of company prevention measures: With simple anonymized comparison values across e.g. departments or locations, focal points for action are prioritized.

A classic win-win situation: employees learn which stress factors particularly motivate or burden them, employers get a holistic picture of the state of health of their own workforce – and can then focus on health prevention. For example, by realigning work processes, planning additional resources or designing offers for occupational health prevention in a target-group-specific manner, whether health advice, planning measures or introducing a holistic occupational health management system. Learn more about how you can optimize your workplace health management:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/1667794604145327885 (German only)

 

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MDR Transition Period – All Clear at Half Time?

Slowly but surely, the end of the transition period for the EU Medical Device Regulation (MDR) of 25 May 2020 is approaching. In the meantime, half of the three-year transition period has elapsed and it is foreseeable that implementation of the MDR in companies in the medical device industry will only progress slowly and that pressure will increase.

This is underlined by the results of a recent survey conducted by RAPS and KPMG. Many of the medical device manufacturers surveyed lack long-term planning to meet the requirements of the new MDR. Only 22% of the respondents confirm a comprehensive understanding and strategy for the MDR impact; 41% have little to no knowledge of the regulations. It is very critical that almost 80% of the respondents currently lack the necessary knowledge and understanding of MDR. Nevertheless, technical experts and the industry associations recommend continuing to work at full speed on the rapid implementation of the MDR requirements. All stakeholders are waiting for detailed information that will make the implementation of the MDR livable. In the meantime, the European Commission has issued a step-by-step guide and a fact sheet for the implementation of the Medical Devices Ordinance. In 2018, the MDCG (Medical Device Coordination Group) also published the first MDR guidelines. But there are still too many ambiguities, such as the term “sufficient clinical data”.

The 4th Spring update Medical Device Conference of TÜV Rheinland Akademie addresses questions and problems in the interpretation and implementation of Medical Device Regulation. The conference also provides a platform for information and exchange on current focal topics for medical device manufacturers. The conference program and registration information can be found at:

https://akademie.tuv.com/shop/product/4-spring-update-medizinproduktekonferenz-2019-5865