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Corporate Resilience_TÜV Rheinland Academy Life Care

Corporate Resilience: Stress stay away!

Your employees are constantly stressed and frequently ill? Then it is high time to focus on corporate resilience. Here you can find out how.

Agile, flexible, “always-on”: The age of digitization demands a lot from employees. One person gets along well with it, the other feels increasingly stressed by the dynamics and in the worst-case becomes ill. To prevent this, companies should work on their corporate resilience. But what does that mean in concrete terms?

There are people who flourish under great stress: The report was actually due yesterday? No problem. The customer visit was brought forward at short notice? Then the other dates have to be moved as well. Anyone who really gets going under high pressure has a high level of resilience – and is therefore well-prepared for the digital age.

However, the growing flood of information, constant restructuring, shortened innovation cycles, and increasing work density are causing massive problems for many employees. This is shown, among other things, by the ever-increasing number of mental illnesses: According to the DAK Psycho report, the number of sick days due to psychological complaints tripled between 1997 and 2017.

Resilience can be learned

Fortunately, something can be done about it: resilience can be learned and strengthened – similar to football or table tennis. Because resilience is not a static toolbox of personal characteristics or positive environmental factors, but a variable and multidimensional process, which ideally – like sports training – is designed continuously. In other words, if you train regularly, you can actively strengthen your personal resistance to stress. And also master stressful job situations calmly.

For this reason alone, companies should put the issue of corporate resilience on their agenda. This includes first of all thoroughly analyzing and – wherever possible – optimizing the resilience constellations in management levels, departments and teams. Important: The focus should not be on pathogenesis but on salutogenesis. In concrete terms: Instead of just asking what made someone sick or threatened to make them sick, the main thing is to find out what can keep them healthy. Preventive approaches to occupational health management therefore attempt not only to work on deficits but also to build on the strengths of an employee. Occupational medical or industrial and organizational psychological (I/O psychology) analyses help.

The role model function of management

The linchpin of corporate resilience is management. The mental health of the entire workforce cannot be separated from the personal resilience of individual superiors. After all, managers are role models on the one hand and stress factors on the other – for example, when a project manager sends instructions to his team at midnight. The message at untimely times burdens employees twice: digitally in the evening and in the office the next day. The consequences are often loss of quality, dissatisfaction and increasing sick leave. This makes it all the more important for the executive floor to put its own resilience competence to the test first and foremost.

In addition to the management’s resilience check, it is also important to modernize the mindset of corporate culture – for example, by dealing with mistakes in an open, transparent and solution-oriented manner. This contributes not only to quality improvements but also to higher employee satisfaction. Last but not least, corporate resilience should be anchored as a strategic initiative with the necessary resources throughout the company as well as the corporate goals. This is the only way to ensure that the topic is permanently embedded in the collective consciousness of employees and management.

Relaxed employees are more productive

And that is important: because employee satisfaction increases in parallel with the company’s resilience. Those who experience their boss as balanced, confident, communicative and loyal will be less ill. According to the AOK Absenteeism Report 2018, a resilient employee is absent for an average of 9.4 days a year – only about half as much as employees who constantly feel stressed. Find out how you can develop the resilience competencies of your managers and employees through intervention and training approaches – with TÜV Rheinland.

ABO psychologists AMD TÜV

If the boss is the problem – and how I/O psychologists may help

Poor management, a lack of conflict, error and criticism culture can cost a company dearly. Due to the shortage of skilled workers, demographic developments and digitalization, the demand for services related to mental health at the workplace are increasing more and more. I/O psychologists (Industrial and Organizational Psychology), for example, are valuable support for organizations. But exactly this is their job and what are their strengths?

For a long time, the mental health of employees has received little attention. With the increasing density of work, ever higher demands and increasing burdens due to digital availability, mental health has also been the focus of attention for a few years now. By 2018, German health insurers had reported an ever-increasing number of cases of mental illness. They are now the most common cause of early retirement and occupational disability in Germany and, with 15.2 percent, are still the third most common cause of absenteeism. Poor leadership, a lack of conflict, error and criticism culture are sooner or later a business-critical issue that can endanger the continued existence of the organization. Above all, people can be overloaded to the point of burnout if they are only supposed to function on the factual level during change processes and are not heard. Fears, emotions and internal and external conflicts are still far too rarely discussed.

Looking behind the façade and promoting healthy cooperation

Unlike psychotherapists, I/O psychologists are not clinicians but analyze an organization and its actors at all hierarchical levels from a socio-psychological perspective. They look behind the façade of a company and analyze social relationships and interactions. How do individual people feel when, for example, they constantly experience themselves in change situations as a result of digitalization? To what extent do the demands and reality of a company’s social dealings soften and how does this affect the perception and behavior of employees? How does a manager lead and communicate? Are emotional needs addressed in communication in addition to factual issues, especially in change situations? And how does a company deal with conflicts, mistakes, and fears? Does a manager then also address the relationship levels between conflict parties and works up disturbed relationships in such a way that it can then continue on a healthy working level? I/O psychologists need a pronounced communicative and social competence. They must ask the right questions and above all be able to listen. They must moderate conversations and be emphatic and sympathetic to people of all hierarchies. Above all, they must impart knowledge and methods on how healthy cooperation in companies, departments or teams should and can be successful.

High qualification requirements for I/O psychologists

Ambitious providers recruit only graduates of a diploma or master’s degree course in psychology. In Germany, the subject has a numerus clause of 1.0. Other courses of study in psychology often do not fulfill the specialist and methodological knowledge that is ideally available. One recognizes quality providers by the fact that they submit enterprises no run-of-the-mill-offers, instead these can clarify beforehand, where the pain points are, what the enterprise needs and expects as purposeful solutions. Even though there are only a few legal requirements for I/O psychologists, large providers also attach great importance to the qualification of their colleagues along with the methodological and technical developments in corporate psychology research and practice.

Interdisciplinary cooperation

In 2013, the German legislator also recognized that mental health is a high value in a modern, synchronized and digitalized working world with increasingly older employees. It, therefore, included a guideline in the Occupational Health and Safety Act that all employers, regardless of the size of their company, must regularly carry out a risk analysis of psychological stress at the workplace. However, the guidelines for the implementation of the “Joint German Occupational Safety and Health Strategy” do not stipulate that such risk analysis must be prepared by psychologists. For example, at AMD TÜV it has been agreed that the psychologists will be in charge of the process, will advise on the methodology and will play a key role in supporting communication. Occupational physicians and safety specialists must also be involved. The cooperation in prevention teams with occupational medicine, occupational health and safety, occupational health promotion and occupational integration management is necessary in order to deal with the complex issues relating to occupational health and safety in companies.

TÜV Rheinland Academy Digital Competence

How TÜV Rheinland Academy empowers digital competence

How do I move safely on the net? How do I recognize a fake profile? How do I judge online communication, how do I distinguish real news from fake news? What is a Meme? Where do I reveal too much of my private life and become a potential victim of identity theft? These are all questions of digital literacy to which children and young people should have an answer. This makes them strong and resistant to the dangers of the internet and prepares them for their professional future. So far, however, digital competence is neither a teaching subject nor part of teacher training in Germany. TÜV Rheinland Academy in Germany is changing this – for example as a partner of DigiCamps. The resonance is unprecedented and has in the meantime the format of a movement, better said in the net speech: DigiCamps goes viral. The aim is to enable the specialists and managers of tomorrow to develop safely and healthily and to start here as early as possible: with schools and teachers.

2017 was the start of “DigiCamps – Life in Balance.” Since then, a republic-wide series has emerged that provides students, teachers, and parents with orientation on the World Wide Web. To provide didactically and pedagogically valuable information about the opportunities and risks of using the internet the social enterprise BG 3000 Service GmbH, the health insurance BARMER and TÜV Rheinland Academy Germany developed smart camps, teacher camps, trainee camps, and DigiCamps. Barmer is sponsoring the initiative, TÜV Rheinland Academy is one of the leading competence developers on board as part of the digital transformation. The primary motivation is that the acquisition of digital competence has to start early. Today and even more in the future, it belongs to the essential teaching contents such as reading, writing, and arithmetic. Parents and teachers must not be left alone with this task.

Optimizing the digital self and avoiding digital stress

A DigiCamp lasts three days and has a modular structure. It is aimed at students, mainly middle school students, teachers, and parents. In interactive workshops, they learn the safe and above all good use of digital media. The trainer teams consist of media educators, psychologists, nutrition and fitness experts and, above all, well-known social media influencers. Together, the participants deal with all facets of internet use. Questions about the functioning of Snapchat, Instagram, etc. are dealt with. The participants deal with the individual challenge of how to optimize their online self. They learn how to recognize addictive behavior in themselves and others and how to handle digital stress. By dealing with their usage patterns and without moral forefinger, the DigiCamps provide recommendations and orientation. Social media and mobile devices are part of life, but good use of them needs to be learned.

Hackers create “aha” effects

The DigiCamps start with impressive demonstrations that IT security specialists prepare according to age. With live hacking experiments, adults and teenagers will experience how quickly an e-mail account with weak passwords can be hacked. They are amazed when they experience the consequences of a travel ticket posted on Facebook and a thumbs up. A thumb recorded with an ordinary smartphone camera can be used to manipulate the fingerprint sensor on a mobile device. These “aha” effects about an unconsidered posting of personal information have a healing effect. Those who have participated in the DigiCamp will at least question their user behavior and ultimately change it.

Influencers clarify

Educating in the best sense of the word is also done by social media giants at the DigiCamps, who have tens of thousands of subscribers on Instagram or YouTube. For example, Irina Engelke (287,000 followers) and Laura Grosch (132,000 followers) report on their Instagram channels during the DigiCamps. Sebastian Meichsner from Bullshit TV, among others, will talk about their YouTube projects with over 1.8 million followers.

Influencers of this kind, who are still in adolescence themselves, inform their peers about the mechanisms of action of these popular platforms. In the workshops, they appeal to their practical experience to use their minds in dealing with social media. Under their guidance and accompanied by pedagogues, the participants on the second and third day create their videos, create blogs, or other digital formats. They also deal with conditions of production and reception. In this way, children and young people learn playfully and concretely how to deal responsibly with these media.

Great interest in the format also from third parties

By the end of 2019, DigiCamps should have taken place in at least 100 schools. The objective of the project is that the teaching staff will then be able to offer their own teaching formats for digital competence in their schools with the extensive teaching materials of the initiative. In the meantime, word of success has spread, and the unique role played by TÜV Rheinland Academy in the interdisciplinary project has become known. Further organizations in Germany and Switzerland are interested in the realization of DigiCamps at schools and with education providers.

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Skilled Worker of India are going to come to Germany

Skilled workers from all over the world: Recruiting made easy for companies

There is a shortage of skilled workers in Germany. The lack already leads to sales losses in many companies. This is why TÜV Rheinland Academy has developed a practice-oriented model with which it is possible to recruit qualified specialists from all over the world on time. The first automotive mechatronics technicians to work at Hyundai dealers in Germany will be coming from India these days. TÜV Rheinland Academy takes over everything that burdens companies. How does the process work?

Hardly any medium-sized company or group is satisfied with the recruitment of skilled workers in Germany. Depending on the study, up to 450,000 well-trained specialists are lacking each year, mainly in the STEM subjects, i.e., Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.

Since other countries in the world are much more consistent in their qualification of STEM, international recruiting is a sensible way for industries and companies to cover the shortage of specialists and to match demand and need perfectly. If only it weren’t for the lack of contacts to suitable applicants, the language barriers, and the associated bureaucracy to allow international specialists to enter the country. Just thinking about it might make some HR departments feel overwhelmed. Even though the law on the immigration of skilled workers has lowered some hurdles, specialized know-how is needed to organize the legal prerequisites for the migration of immigrants into the local labor market.

TÜV Rheinland Academy has now developed a model with which companies can meet their demand for skilled workers in a targeted and timely manner – without having to worry about the associated formalities and the sophisticated recruitment and qualification process – to overcome precisely these hurdles. Above all, they can be sure that the new employees actually meet the desired requirement profile.

The Academy is currently running pilot projects with various partners from the motor vehicle sector. The initial pilot project was launched at the beginning of 2019 to meet the demand for automotive mechatronics technicians at Hyundai Motor Deutschland GmbH. By 2022, TÜV Rheinland Academy is to recruit up to 250 specialists in India. The first 100 have already been won and are currently being prepared with their local colleagues for their deployment in Germany. The new employees commit themselves for at least 36 months. If an employee is absent prematurely, TÜV Rheinland Academy will fill the position again.

Good qualification and motivation
With the new model, the client benefits from the expertise of TÜV Rheinland Academy in the area of competence development and from the internationality of TÜV Rheinland Academy in more than 26 countries. Cooperation within the TÜV Rheinland Group begins with a competent local recruitment process and continues through to integration management in Germany.
In the current case, the Indian branch of TÜV Rheinland Academy identifies suitable candidates on the basis of the requirements profile drawn up by the client. In India, for example, there are seven university degrees that are comparable to the occupational profile and competence profile of the local mechatronics technician. The shortlist will include applicants who speak excellent English and have at least two years of practical work experience. Together with the client’s personnel, TÜV Rheinland Academy conducts the first interviews with applicants. Besides, the candidates are thoroughly prepared both linguistically and technically for the future requirements in Germany. Via language schools and in future also by means of virtual language training, they acquire language level A2 with a certificate and take the B1 examination in the first three months after arrival and are further qualified to B2 if required.
If there is a need for further professional training, the specialists to be placed are trained in the contents by TÜV Rheinland Academy with online learning that has been tried and tested over many years. The complete materials of the dual German vocational training as a mechatronics technician form the basis.

Complex procedures for professional recognition and entry
Once the mechatronics engineers have signed their employment contract, the TÜV Rheinland Academy team in India will continue to guide them through the process. Among other things, it prepares them thoroughly for the cultural and labor law conditions in Germany – supported by the team of TÜV Rheinland Academy in Germany. The German colleagues take care of the recognition of the Indian qualification certificates in this case and the residence regulations. TÜV Rheinland Academy has agreed with the Cologne Chamber of Crafts (HWK) on a procedure for the examination of certificates so that formal recognition by the decentralized HWK can take place quickly. Visas and other proofs, according to the recently passed law on the immigration of skilled workers complete the preparation for entry. By the time the plane takes off for Germany, around 30 documents per person will have to be processed, partially translated, and certified. This effort has already been standardized to such an extent that TÜV Rheinland Academy will be able to bring numerous specialists to Germany every month in the future if required.

It is still a pilot project, but it is starting off so promisingly that it will be extended to other countries in the international TÜV Rheinland network as well as other technical professions and sectors. Numerous other companies from medium-sized businesses and industry have already expressed a great deal of interest. Soon we will report on the progress of this project – the best thing is to come back soon.

TÜV Rheinland Academy_from professions_competencies

New Work: From profession to competence

If you’re going to remain competitive in the labor market, you have to develop your competencies. If you want to monetize your workforce, you have to be flexible and willing to learn. Hardly anyone works his whole life in the same profession. This applies to both companies and employees. In the USA, sometimes competencies are already more important than the vocational qualification once acquired. Is that the future?

The ever shorter half-life of once obtained knowledge has been further shortened with the advent of the computer, rationalization, and automation. Since the 1980s,  it has become increasingly clear that lifelong learning is essential in many occupations. The professional idea, which is based on having undergone a clearly defined education and which has since developed further through real on-the-job training, is becoming more and more defensive. Today, the profession is at best an entrance ticket to the foyer of professional life, which after a few years is hardly suitable as a ticket for the next levels of the career ladder.

New Work in the Age of Digitalization

In the developed economies of the West, further development of the professional idea can already be observed in the nineties. In the USA, labor market researchers and labor ministers such as Robert Reich already recognized in the first Clinton Administration since 1993 that the dependent middle class needed access to the labor market even without a university degree. Inspired by the theses of “New Work”, which the Austrian-American social philosopher Frithjof Bergman founded in the 1980s, employment and education programs were developed that no longer addressed the deficits of the rural unemployed, but rather the existing competence that needed to be developed. Starting from the thesis, which has been refuted today, that the job system is at its end, the freedom of action and independence of people beyond gainful employment must be promoted. After the New Work was discussed a dozen times up and down, the term is now experiencing a renaissance with digitalization, but with different signs. Again, the motive is to open access to the labor market to a detached “working class”. Unlike Bergman, however, it is not a question of the emancipation of the former industrial workers in the “Rust Belt”, as the Democrats call them “White Trash”. Rather, it is digitization and the shortage of skilled workers and the associated lack of digital skills in companies that have led to the emergence of new qualification programs in the USA.

TechHire relies on competencies beyond formal qualification

If you can do the job, you should get the job: Since 2015, the social enterprise TechHire has been expanding in the USA, operating over 200 training facilities in 72 municipalities in social partnership with 1,300 employers. The model is similar to a dual training program according to the German model. The experts use online entrance tests to identify competencies and interests. Discussions with potential employers follow this. After a few months of all-day training, the participants complete an internship in a company. A wide variety of local TechHire companies specialize in qualifications in technology industries. Specifically, they have improved matching between job seekers, employers, teachers, policy-makers and local training groups: the online tool “training finder“, developed by LinkedIn’s business network, links relevant information on competence profiles and income opportunities, skills required, training programs and vacancies for different job advertisements.

Thus even applicants who do not formally have any qualifications, but who have acquired competencies even in self-study, have a chance to specifically promote them in order to get them into jobs. Autodidacts, for example, who work on computers in their spare time also have a chance to get a job as a software tester with 40,000 dollars after a qualification. TechHire’s competence-oriented approach has already enabled companies to fill 4,000 vacancies that would otherwise remain vacant today.

Conclusion: Competence development creates a vocation

TechHire and its partners have thus managed in an unbureaucratic and, above all, intelligent way to make a contribution to reducing the shortage of skilled workers in companies and to imparting new individual perspectives to people by promoting competencies. A mission to which TÜV Rheinland Academy has committed itself, particularly in the field of technical professions. Digitalization is constantly creating new requirement profiles for which it is necessary to establish appropriate competence models that enable people and organizations to remain capable of action and to actively shape both the present and the future. Artificial intelligence, digitization and automation will create many new jobs that will have to be taken over by today’s “skilled workers”. The way there is competence development on the job, actively supported by companies that have recognized the value of lifelong learning. It is also important to lay the right foundations in the field of initial vocational training for young people and to start thinking about tomorrow’s requirements today. Application cases of TÜV Rheinland Academy, which as a partner supports governments in various countries worldwide in establishing competence development via the dual training system according to the German model, close the technical education gap between state schools and degrees and the requirements of the industry. In this way, people and companies are actively enabled to master the challenges of digital transformation. In individual cases, personnel certifications ensure that competencies are always up to date and ensure a uniform quality level of the employees in the company.

 

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IT-Professionals_TÜV Rheinland Academy

What are the top-paying certifications among IT professionals?

IT professionals urgently needed – and well paid! This statistic shows the 15 highest-paying provider certifications among IT professionals worldwide as of 2019. The average salary of an IT professional who was certified as a cloud architect on the Google Cloud Platform is currently around 140 thousand U.S. dollars worldwide.
What are you waiting for? Book your training as an IT professional now at www.tuv.com/academy.

 

Top 10 top-paying certifications among IT professionals worldwide as of 2019 (in U.S. dollars)*

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OTSecurityProfessional; TÜV Rheinland

New certification initiative to increase safety of industrial plants

Hackers are increasingly attacking operational technology systems in industrial plants. These systems detect physical effects or control motors, pumps or valves in industrial system. These systems are increasingly connected to the Internet in order to improve efficiency or help gain a competitive edge. These systems or  components may have vulnerabilities that can be exploited by cyber-attacks. As  cybersecurity knowledge and skills in this domain are lacking TÜV Rheinland has developed the “Certified Operational Technology Cybersecurity Professional (TÜV)” certification program, which supports companies in identifying and improving team skills and thus increasing the overall cybersecurity of industrial and operational technology facilities.

The Triton malware attack reported in December 2017 was the first publicly documented cyber-attack on an industrial control infrastructure (ICS) designed to interfere with the operation of a Safety Instrumented System (SIS) used to protect an industrial plant as a fail safe against fire or explosion. According to experts, this incident was an urgent warning that attackers with geopolitical motives are now targeting security-critical systems.

The aim of attacks is usually to obtain intellectual property, trade secrets and technical information but many companies are unaware of the dangers cyber-attacks pose to their plants. In addition, their controls for cybersecurity are usually not tailored to the protection of OT systems. According to the new study “Industrial Security in 2019: A TÜV Rheinland Perspective“, 40 percent of respondents say they have never investigated the risks posed by cyber-attacks on industrial plants. A further 34 percent do not know whether their own company has ever investigated these risks. In addition, only one in five companies has tailored its cybersecurity measures specifically to industrial or OT facilities. This is alarming, as attacks from the network can shut down entire plants. This leads to production losses with high consequential costs and, in the case of critical infrastructures, can also have an impact on the overall security of supply and the smooth operation of modern society.

If production facilities or critical infrastructures – such as those of energy suppliers – are networked, this offers additional targets for cyber-attacks. Almost 70 percent of the respondents to the survey came from the manufacturing industry; in addition, the automotive industry, logistics companies, the oil and gas industry, public institutions as well as the telecommunications, energy and chemical industries were represented. The aim of the study was to better understand how companies detect and take protective measures against cyber-attacks. Because traditional knowledge in the field of cybersecurity is often not sufficient to meet the complex requirements of the industrial, networked world, TÜV Rheinland has developed this new certification for experts in the field of industrial cybersecurity.

More quality for the industry

With the new personal certification, TÜV Rheinland is responding to the increasing demand from specialists. In such a complex area as cybersecurity, a certification program from a neutral third party such as TÜV Rheinland can help to align companies’ expertise with the requirements of industrial cybersecurity and further professionalize industrial companies in this area.

The certification program actively evaluates candidates through a combination of professional career review, interview and technical review. Participants must have at least ten years’ experience in cybersecurity, including five years in a leadership role. The candidates prepare a case study as part of the examination. After a critical review by TÜV Rheinland experts, they will be invited to an online presentation and technical question and answer session. Experts who meet the standard receive a certificate from TÜV Rheinland and can use the title “Certified Operational Technology Cybersecurity Professional (TÜV)”. Re-certification by TÜV Rheinland is required every three years. Further information on the program can be found at:
www.tuv.com/en/otcybersecurityprofessional.

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Virtual Class Room

Learning Trends 2019: Learning Apps and Extended Reality Increase

In 2019, digital media and methods in professional training, in particular, will continue to gain ground. This is reflected in the current “Learning Delphi,” a yearly trend monitor of the German mmb institute, think tank and driving force for innovation in education and learning. While Extended Reality (XR) is rapidly gaining in importance, wikis are slowly moving into the background over the years. According to experts in this study, web-based training is also losing its previously high position. It is clear that new digital technologies could slowly replace the old ones. The Trend Monitor is based on a survey of 65 education experts from companies, educational institutions and universities in Germany, according to which learning apps, explanatory videos, and digital learning assistants are top-rated.

The future of professional training is becoming even more digital, with social learning also gaining in relevance for 72 percent of the experts surveyed. Immersive learning applications are significant increasing: Extended Reality continues to grow. The term immersive is known from the gaming scene and means “deepening.” A recent study by the Turkish Gazi University in Ankara confirmed that XR has a positive influence on learning success. To teach their students how to assemble computer motherboards, Professor Dr. Ebru Kılıç Çakmak of the Faculty of Education used an immersive learning application. The marker-based XR application of educational researcher Çakmak, called “HardwareAR,” provided students with information about the properties of hardware components, ports, and assemblies. A control group acquired the theoretical and applied information about main board assembly from textbooks. The other students used the “HardwareAR” application. As a result, they were able to complete the assembly process in a shorter time and required less support. The AR students were significantly more successful than the textbook control group.

Blended learning, explanatory videos and learning apps clearly at the center
While training and further education in the craft trades can benefit from XR, other digital learning aids are on the advance in classically oriented professional training topics. Around 60 percent of the respondents to the “Learning Delphi” survey assume that “intelligent learning assistants” will establish themselves as an innovative form of learning over the next three years. Intended are systems that accompany learners through a learning process in dialogue form and remind them of deadlines and learning workloads. 97 percent of the experts regard Blended Learning and 89 percent Learning Apps as an increasingly important form of learning. The evergreen “Explanation Videos” is in second place with 94 percent. The importance of simulations has increased significantly from 36 to 53 percent. However, these findings may differ depending on age and generation and on the global average, as the following study shows:

most-preferred-workplace-learning-methods-

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TRA_young-student-of-mechatronics-working-on-project-XCZT8JQ

Where do most artificial intelligence professionals work?

In general, Artificial Intelligence (AI) refers to the attempt to reproduce certain human decision-making structures, e.g. by building and programming a computer in such a way that it can work on problems relatively independently. Often, however, this also refers to imitated intelligence, whereby “intelligent behavior” is to be simulated using mostly simple algorithms, for example in computer games. The understanding of the term artificial intelligence often reflects the enlightenment idea of “man as machine”, the imitation of which is aimed at the so-called strong AI: to create an intelligence that is to mechanize human thinking,[1] or to construct and build a machine that reacts intelligently or behaves like a human being. (Source: Wikipedia) But even artificial intelligence cannot get far without humans. According to a survey on LinkedIn, the USA has the highest number of Artificial Intelligence (AI) experts in the world.

TRA_ai-professionals-by-country-_TÜVRheinland

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Poland Combined efforts in elderly care for Germany_TÜVRheinland.jpg

Elderly care competence in Poland for the need in Germany

As one of the fastest-growing societies in Europe, the demand for services for seniors in various sectors is increasing in Poland, but also in Germany. Due to market needs for professionally trained, qualified and certified employees in Poland, TÜV Rheinland Academy has started developing different programs for elderly care, oriented to the requirements of the German market.

Many employment agencies in Poland employ their teams in the elderly care sector, particularly in Germany. In 2011, one of the most significant association of employment agencies was interested in training for the staff who take care of seniors and working abroad especially in Germany as the elderly care assistant. Even though they already have many years of experience, the association wanted to train the staff and increased their competencies with certified qualifications also recognized on the German market. Therefore, TÜV Rheinland Academy Poland developed a customized project for the employment agencies and their customers.

Due to restrictive regulations of the German market, German employers increasingly demand the qualifications and competencies of employees in the elderly care industry. These regulations define the scope of requirements for people performing care and care activities. The Polish training meets these requirements — divided into two modules the training offers one self-learning part (in the form of scripts) as a preparation for the second module which covers 80 hours of intensive workshops.

On the first day of the workshop, there is a written exam from the self-learning part. With the final personnel certification the Polish attendant of elderly care now stands out in the market, especially in contrast to non-qualified people in this branch. The competence of the staff is essential in assessing the quality of care services provided. Careers, apart from detailed theoretical and practical preparation, must also have appropriate interpersonal skills. In this industry, high sensitivity to the needs of older people is of paramount importance, where the basis is the knowledge and understanding of those under care.

E-learning Module “Dementia diseases”

Initially, the training for the customized project for employment agencies was based on the German “Nursing Assistant” (Pflegehelfer) program with the exam and the final personnel certification. After three years of experience with this target group, TÜV Rheinland Poland gained the know-how to develop other trainings specified for the local market needs. One of the developed training contains a three day short workshop plus an e-learning module about the topic “Dementia diseases”, to fulfill the training content. This training was developed under an EU project dedicated mostly for the employees who already work with seniors in daily houses or nursing homes.

TÜV Rheinland Academy Poland pays particular attention to the quality of the training programs. An essential factor during the workshops is the ability of the students to use rehabilitation beds, wheelchairs, blood pressure monitors and small care devices properly. However, the ability to communicate with seniors and activate them again and again as well as the soft skills of the accompanying staff also play a major role. To date, our colleagues in Poland have trained more than 200 participants in various courses.  Although there is a great need for training in the elderly care sector, the main focus of investment has long been on infrastructure or equipment. Fortunately, it is becoming apparent that awareness of the qualification needs of the personnel is also slowly increasing in nursing care for the elderly. TÜV Rheinland Academy Poland is prepared to make its contribution to ensuring that the level of competence within the sector rises as quickly as possible in favour of the elderly.

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