Companies and their trainees in professions with technical competence also suffer from Corona. TÜV Rheinland Academy, as a leading provider of technical competence development, has therefore expanded its worldwide TVET services. Welders and electrical engineers are now also attending Virtual Classrooms in their vocational training to learn their trades. The solution: simulations shorten practical exercises on industrial equipment used in small groups and at a distance since the pandemic.

For trainees and students of an oil company on the Arabian Peninsula, the lockdown was initially shocking. Their training was threatened to be suspended indefinitely. But they were lucky. Within a few days, their training center set up Virtual Classrooms for the vocational training. The training center operator, TÜV Rheinland Academy, implements technical training for industrial groups worldwide as part of its TVET programs. TVET stands for Technical and Vocational Education and Training and is based on the dual training model that is very successful in Germany. Its clients are companies, educational institutions, and governments from all over the world that invest in their workforce’s technical competence development. TÜV Rheinland Academy advises its customers, develops educational concepts and training plans, and operates worldwide.

150 trainers and 1,000 apprentices with new training plans in the Virtual Classroom

The effort was not without its price, with Corona, the TVET team had to rethink everything once again. In Saudi Arabia, the approximately 150 trainers converted the current training plans for oil and gas technicians, which were currently running for prospective welders, electricians, process control, and operations specialists. Instead of regularly alternating between the training workshop and the classroom, they shifted a large part of the curriculum to digital platforms. They brought forward the academic units and implemented Virtual Classrooms in vocational training.

Virtual Classrooms in vocational training and in general take place on an Internet platform where trainers and students meet at the same time and design the lessons together. The advantage is that physical presence is no longer required. At the same time, however, trainers and students experience each other directly via their mobile devices and can interact. To achieve this, the trainers had to adapt their didactics and methods to the Virtual Classroom platforms. The practical parts of the training were initially prepared intensively with instructional films and simulations. Of course, a welder has to practice handling the different welding devices until he or she can make a good weld. With simulation tools, some practical skills can already be developed, even if the trainees cannot work on a real device in the training workshop. Welding simulators already impart a technical feel for the operation of the equipment and material properties. Once the loosening up had begun, the participants were thus well prepared for their first use of the machine – naturally with the necessary distance and in small groups. In the meantime, the practical modules are being made up for. Our experience with Corona also shows that many things can be done that previously seemed impossible. The trainers on site have worked with significant commitment. No participant fell by the wayside – on the contrary. Some of the trainers even reported that they sometimes also managed to improve their performance control. Because every day, they assign tasks that the students have to implement and submit. As a result, performance deficits and comprehension problems were noticed earlier by some of them, who could otherwise duck away more easily in real classroom situations.

Conclusion: Virtual Classrooms make sense in technical competence development

Even if the practical training of the TVET programs remains a central component, it is conceivable that the Virtual Classrooms in vocational training could become a permanent part. Travel and accommodation will only be necessary for practical modules, which will bring great cost benefits to a giant empire like China. Investments in mobile devices will then be less decisive, especially if “physical distancing” is still necessary. TÜV Rheinland Academy will also be able to organize the assessment of performance levels and even examinations online in the future using tried and tested tools. And the experience we all made during the pandemic shows that many things can be implemented sensibly in the development of technical skills in the Virtual Classroom.

Here you can find the current offers in Virtual Classrooms of TÜV Rheinland Academy.

Competence Management TÜV Rheinland Academy

Virtual classrooms have been around for a long time, but since Corona, they have become even more popular. Providers of further education like TÜV Rheinland Academy digitalized their regular seminar offer within a short time and modified the training methods and didactics. The aim is to use digital technology effectively for all learning types with Virtual Classrooms (VC).

Training in seminar rooms is only possible with a hygiene concept until a vaccine is discovered. The “physical distancing” is valid indefinitely. However, further occupational training must not be allowed to fall by the wayside. For companies and their employees, there are excellent opportunities, especially now. As long as many companies are still in short-time work, the time can be used to extend the Corona-related learning curves. In times of low workload, investments in the qualification of employees are worthwhile.

Because by building up competence, employers and employees strengthen their competitiveness for the future of work. Furthermore, anyone taking part in further training in a Virtual Classroom from their home office or via mobile device today enjoys a lively learning world with interaction and fun, including simultaneous monitoring of learning success.

From e-Learning to Virtual Classrooms

Concepts and technical solutions for lively, interactive formats of corporate knowledge transfer have been around since the 90s. Synchronous learning media have been part of professional training from the very beginning. Those who spoke of e-learning usually had web-based training in mind. Limiting factors were often the technical infrastructure or the lack of bandwidth. Interaction between participants and trainers took place via chats or telephone conferences.

To support the participants even better in designing their learning environment and learning progress, educational institutions and universities developed Virtual Classrooms, which take place synchronously and live in class. All trainers, moderators, and participants are connected live via webcam and headsets. This opens up educational and methodological possibilities that are almost equal to those of real seminars.

In addition to the traditional whiteboard lecture by a trainer, participants can exchange views in open discussions followed by an online participant survey. This happens in a video conference, which also gets a new liveliness through chats.

Participants can also make their contributions, give speeches, and record presentations or videos from their computers. In addition to this, working groups can be formed; asynchronous newsgroups complement the exchange within the framework of digital learning, which has the great advantage of being able to combine an entire toolset for synchronous and asynchronous learning processes (Blended Learning).

Virtual Classrooms: Immediate feedback for trainers and participants

Because people’s learning behavior is different, some have a short attention span and are easily distracted, which was a particular challenge in the home office during the Corona pandemic and still is in some instances. Some need fixed structures; others prefer to divide up the learning material themselves. In all situations, some form of social interaction is desirable to revive the joy of learning and learning progress. The recurring challenge for education providers and competence partners is to meet all these needs within the framework of digital learning – especially in times of Corona.

Good trainers use the knowledge of the learning types in their courses to adapt their educational modules to these optimally. Impulse presentations of thirty or more minutes, which were common in the past, are divided up into several smaller ones. These can be varied with videos, group work, and flash surveys to involve the participants in the further course of the seminar unit. All in all, the lessons are more interactive, multimedia-based, and sometimes also with playful elements.
Trainers use short one-on-one conversations to check individual learning statuses. In this way, they receive immediate feedback, for example, to close gaps in knowledge early on by repeating the lessons. And even performance assessments can now be carried out in a legally compliant manner using appropriate tools with clear identification.

Digital and conventional training will complement each other even more closely in the future

Even if the practical skills still have to be trained in the future, as in the case of welder training, the necessary theoretical knowledge can certainly be taught in a Virtual Classroom  – possibly supplemented by innovative digital approaches, such as a virtual reality scenario. This allows smaller groups to use available practical training places alternately. In any case, the trainers from TÜV Rheinland Academy have shown during the Corona shutdown that they can also convey previously conventional offerings successfully from their seminar portfolio in Virtual Classrooms.

Above all, feedback from participants also shows that they experienced a lively learning world with interaction and fun. One participant put it in a nutshell: “For two days, I took part in an online seminar at TÜV Rheinland. The tutor was professional, serious, and responsible. Instead of seemingly boring terms and lessons, I experienced enthusiastic explanations that stay in my mind. To every question, the trainer responded in time and with a smile and gave professional answers. And she also asked questions so that we could interact well. The three-day Virtual Classroom has awakened my enthusiasm to continue learning online. ”

Here you can find the current online offer of TÜV Rheinland Academy from Virtual Classrooms to e-learnings by simply choosing your country.

 

Competence Management TÜV Rheinland Academy

 

On September 27, 2018, TÜV Rheinland Academy formally released its “Welcoming Industry 4.0 White Paper on the Development of Chinese Vocational Education” (hereafter referred to as the “White Paper”) at the International Summit and Exhibition for Vocational Education held in Guangzhou. Ms. Sherin Lin, Vice President of Academy & Life Care, TÜV Rheinland Greater China, and Carlo Humberg, Expert on the German dual vocational education system from TÜV Rheinland Academy, jointly revealed key parts of the White Paper at the event while also setting out the challenges, opportunities and developments for Chinese vocational education. TÜV Rheinland Academy worked with its equipment partners to introduce advanced vocational education implementations such as VR, Microsoft HoloLens and MR at the exhibition. Visitors were provided with a novel experience on integrated consulting solutions for dual vocational education in China.

White paper on dual vocational education in China

Lin said: “Chinese vocational education is now at a crossroads in development. The rise of Industry 4.0 means the upgrading of the manufacturing industry and the popularization of high and new technologies such as artificial intelligence. Conventional manufacturing expertise is now faced with a new round of challenges in professional development and this means tremendous development potential for technical and vocational education in China. TÜV Rheinland Academy analyzed more than one hundred businesses and schools against this current backdrop. The results were used to compile the White Paper that will hopefully serve as a useful guide for vocational education in China. The White Paper can also provide the Chinese vocational education industry as well as the reform and development of vocational educational institutions with a reference for their decision-making and help promote the cultivation of professional talent in China. ”

The White Paper is divided into three chapters that analyze the following topics based on research findings: Current status of Chinese vocational education in the lead-up to Industry 4.0 age; New opportunities in Chinese vocational education in the Industry 4.0 age; and Development trends in Chinese vocational education. In Chapter 1, TÜV Rheinland explains the challenges facing Chinese vocational education including the mismatch between the standard of vocational education and industry development, shortage of new talent, and shortfall in new vocational educators. Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 dissects the new opportunities for vocational education in the Industry 4.0 age. Highlights include the strengths of the German dual education system and its direction of localization development, as well as an outline of school-business cooperation models, and inter-institution cooperation.

Download free white paper (Chinese):
“Welcoming Industry 4.0 White Paper on the Development of Chinese Vocational Education”

Pannel discussion on “Educational fusion using digital techniques”

Carlo Humberg, our Expert of the German dual vocational education system and the Senior Project Manager of TÜV Rheinland Academy, also took part in the pannel discussion on “Educational fusion using digital techniques” held at the same time. Humberg mentioned that even though the “Industry 4.0” concept is connected to continued increases in the level of automation in manufacturing techniques, it is the people that ultimately matters in “Industry 4.0.” That is why most of the recent discussions about “Industry 4.0” have revolved around the development of useful and essential skillsets in current and future employees. For vocational education in China, the main challenge posed by “Industry 4.0” is to the content of technical training courses. Upgrades must be made in response to technological developments and improvements made to organizational processes for a more team-oriented approach. A decision must then be made on what needs to be integrated.

The latest updates made by Germany to its national teaching materials for electrical and mechanical subjects now incorporate new skills with a particular emphasis on digitization. As the oldest and most famous training and education organization in Europe, TÜV Rheinland Academy inherits the spirit of German craftsmanship and has many years of experience with dual training. It strives to promote the exchange and fusion of advanced techniques and educational models from Germany and China in order to drive the development of Chinese industry and education.

Vocational Training at TÜV Rheinland Academy China

TÜV Rheinland Academy has been operating in China for over three decades, bringing with its over 145 years of brand development and technical expertise as well some of the best talents in the industry. Efforts in recent years have focused on the development of a new approach to vocational education in China. Successful partnerships have been set up with a number of vocational schools including Guangzhou Light Industry Senior Technical School, Jiangmen City Technical School, Hainan College of Vocation and Technique, Shenzhen No.3 Vocational School of Technology, and The First vocational school of Tanggu Binhai new area Tianjin. The above partnerships combined the resources of TÜV Rheinland Academy and the vocational schools to provide a demonstration of the “dual system” in action. In the Sino-German Smart Manufacturing Academy for example the partners built an Industry 4.0 simulated factory that used the latest international technical resources and education system to provide an advanced demonstration of the “smart manufacturing” and “German dual” vocational education system in China. The cultivation of highly skilled talents for supporting the development of the smart manufacturing industry will help drive the transformation and upgrade of the entire industry chain.

In addition to strengthening school-business cooperation in Industry 4.0, TÜV Rheinland Academy is also working with vocational schools to set up training and examination centers. The training center will develop course resources based on international standards that will improve faculty standards and quality of teaching. The center will also carry out testing and accreditation of students based on their actual abilities. Recently completed projects include international training and certification of welding expertise with the Jiangmen Technical School, as well as the New Energy Vehicle Intelligent Automotive Training Center in partnership with Shanghai Boshi Motor Repair School.

“The transformation of Chinese vocational education is a matter of great urgency. TÜV Rheinland will lend its support through its own technical strengths and expertise.” concluded Lin.

Competence Management TÜV Rheinland Academy

Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)

Organizations around the globe have increasing demands for qualified employees to meet market expectations that are driven by technology. When management realizes the importance of vocational training or further education of their employees they face the challenge of how to realize it effectively in terms of time, effort and result. Whether you are a private company, a governmental authority or an educational institute, TÜV Rheinland supports you to further educate your employees in line with your local industry demands.

Practical and targeted technical vocational training means better skilled and qualified employees, which in turn leads to improved regional, economic and social development. In such an environment, potential employees find more job opportunities and companies can draw on qualified staff to boost production or provide enhanced services. Companies may even experience cost reductions as it becomes easier to hire locally rather than internationally.

Technical Vocational Education and Training of TÜV Rheinland ensures a simple but high efficient way of qualification for your employees – worldwide. In our concept of vocational training, your employees learn the theory and can on top immediately practice with the didactic training systems. Thus, after the training, your employees are perfectly prepared for their professional responsibilities.

We are strongly rooted in the German dual vocational system and offer customized vocational learning solutions and a broad scope of related consultancy services especially in technical fields, and available across all industries. Choosing us enables you to access a depth of expertise and technical knowledge difficult to find elsewhere. The breadth of our experience in nearly every industry allows us to create workforce development programs to meet your specific needs.

We enable you:

  • to develop skills and competencies of your current and future employees.
  • to close skill gap.
  • to develop your employees´ potential continuously.
  • to increase international mobility of your people.
  • to train your trainers.
Learn more in our video how it works:

Our strong partnership, your one-stop solutions in technical trainings – worldwide!

TÜV Rheinland and Lucas-Nülle present their one-stop solutions for technical „Trainings Made in Germany” at GESS in Dubai. The world leading education exhibition and conference GESS takes place at the Dubai World Trade Center on 1st to 3rd March 2016.
Continue reading “GESS Dubai 2016 | Training Made in Germany”

Training activities of TÜV Rheinland in India meet the needs of the growing Indian industries.

The TÜV Rheinland training experts train young people to become highly motivated and qualified members of the workforce.  Read here about TÜV Rheinland NIFE Academy India, CAIRN Centre of Excellence operated by TÜV Rheinland, and SITRUST™ – first Indian holistic practical Health & Safety Training Center.

One of India’s biggest challenges, as well as advantages, is its growing, young population. The average Indian will only be 29 years old in 2020. India targets the creation of 500 million skilled workers by 2022, and Germany is one of its strongest partners for this.

indian-workerUntil now, companies have regularly complained of the intense difficulty of finding appropriately skilled, employable workers for jobs in factories or services, such as sales or customer service agents, while poorly-educated young people struggle to find remunerative work. Skilled construction workers are also in acutely short supply.

The activities of TÜV Rheinland in India meet the needs of the growing Indian industries. Examples include both the NIFE Academy and the CAIRN Centre of Excellence (CCOE). The goal of the TÜV Rheinland training experts is to train young people to become highly motivated and qualified members of the workforce. In the vocational training courses the attendees learn a wide range of professional skills through practical training which will further enhance their qualification.

TÜV Rheinland NIFE Academy India

TÜV Rheinland NIFE Academy India has been part of TÜV Rheinland since January 2014. The Indian training service provider currently supports more than 10,000 participants in 65 cities across India. The company operates over 40 direct training centers, 28 franchise centers and 3 information centers with top-class training.

Operational health and safety is a hot topic in the world of business today. Fire safety is at the crux of international business and is a critical requirement for all business operations. TÜV Rheinland NIFE Academy was founded with the vision of providing vocational training programs to meet industry demand for highly qualified people.

TÜV Rheinland NIFE Academy India attracts young people aged 17 to 24 with its wide range of unique and well-designed courses – from seminars lasting several days to university degrees. The training catalogue is focused on training and certificates in:

  • fire and safety
  • lift technology
  • fiber optics technology
  • facilities

A certificate program in inventory and stores, and a corporate training complete the portfolio.

CAIRN Centre of Excellence (CCOE), India Goes Into Operation

The new state-of-the-art center for providing training in advanced disciplines goes into operation. It was established by Cairn India in Jodhpur, Rajasthan with a total investment volume of US $10 –11 million CCOE is operated by TÜV Rheinland in India. It develops competent and confident market-ready professionals with world-class vocational skills.

The center offers vocational training in

  • welding
  • automobile – servicing and maintenance
  • renewable energy – installation and maintenance
  • retail – customer sales agent

Seminars and courses on various topics will be organized on a regular basis.

[gdl_gallery title=”cairn-gallery” width=”125″ height=”83″ ]

The newly built training center provides training courses with high a relevance to the modern economy thus providing the state of Rajasthan with a world-class facility supported by industry and with strong placement linkages. Courses pertaining to the oil and gas industry will be introduced as a next step.

About CAIRN

Cairn India Limited is one of the largest oil and gas exploration companies in India and one of the fastest growing energy companies in the world. The company is committed to conducting its business in a socially responsible, ethical and environmentally friendly manner and to continuously work towards improving the quality of life of the communities in its operational areas. CCOE was established in one of its large scale CSR initiatives.

SITRUST™
First Indian holistic practical Health & Safety Training Center

SITRUSTTM stands for Siemens & TÜV Rheinland Unique Safety Training. Here’s more about the Siemens TÜV Rheinland Global Skill Centre for Occupational Safety in Mumbai in partnership with TÜV Rheinland.
Link →