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Generation Z _ TÜV Rheinland Akademie

Generation Z: How to score as an employer

The Generation Z works to live. Not the other way around. The digital natives have correspondingly high expectations of their employers. 5 fields of action that you should work on as a boss or manager.

For members of Generation Z, living without Instagram, Whatsapp, or YouTube is possible but meaningless. After all, those born after 1998 have been at home on the (mobile) Internet since childhood. However, anyone who associates Generation Z with a high affinity for technology is falling short. Because the workforce of the future is characterized by one thing above all: They show attitude and have values. Whether Fridays for future, BlackLivesMatter, or the consistent renunciation of meat: Members of Generation Z know what they want and are committed to it.

This is even more true in the job: For many job starters, making a career is secondary for the first time, but it is much more important to do something meaningful. This is why the young generation of skilled workers cannot be inspired to take up a job by flexible working hours and remuneration models alone. Instead, they attach great importance to “soft” aspects such as the right to a say, open communication at eye level, and working in an equal team. This requires one thing above all: a modern corporate culture without rigid hierarchies and short decision-making paths.

Five success factors for companies that want to inspire members of Generation Z

1. Innovative remuneration systems

Money alone does not make you happy. A truism that nevertheless only a few companies take to heart. Of course, skilled workers of Generation Z also want to be properly paid for their work. However, researchers at the University of Basel have shown that classic wage increases do not permanently improve employee motivation. On the other hand, free company parking, company bicycles, fuel vouchers, or other flexible remuneration instruments contribute much more to making young employees feel comfortable at their workplace.

2. Flexible working hours

Time clock, time card, and working hours set in stone are a no-go for Generation Z. The compatibility of family and career is an important issue for the next generation of professionals. They want to decide for themselves when they work. And not only when they have small children. But in general. Some people are more productive early in the morning, while others tend to get into top form in the late afternoon or evening. So companies that don’t restrict their employees benefit twice over: employee loyalty increases. Productivity, as well.

3. Work opportunities independent of location

In addition to working hours, the place of work also plays a major role for Generation Z. At the latest, since the beginning of the Corona pandemic, the home office has become a matter of course for employees and companies. This is good news for the next generation of skilled workers. The crisis has made working from home acceptable – now companies should take the opportunity to offer their young employees even more flexible working conditions.

4. Cooperative management models

It used to be clear: What the boss says is valid. But in Generation Z, authoritarian bosses bite the dust. The future workers no longer want to be restricted from above but demand maximum freedom of action and decision-making. They do not want to continue to be the recipients of orders after school, training, or studies. True to the formula “Shared responsibility leads to double success,” companies should rely on cooperative management concepts.

5. A good working atmosphere

One of the most important aspects of scoring with Generation Z workers is a good working atmosphere. This starts with a good management style and does not end with the collegial interaction between employees. The design of the premises and workplaces as well as team events outside work also contribute significantly to a good working atmosphere. Those who keep in touch with their employees after work blur the line between work and leisure time. This goes down very well with Generation Z.

Competence Management TÜV Rheinland Akademie

 

ABO psychologists AMD TÜV

If the boss is the problem – and how I/O psychologists may help

Poor management, a lack of conflict, error and criticism culture can cost a company dearly. Due to the shortage of skilled workers, demographic developments and digitalization, the demand for services related to mental health at the workplace are increasing more and more. I/O psychologists (Industrial and Organizational Psychology), for example, are valuable support for organizations. But exactly this is their job and what are their strengths?

For a long time, the mental health of employees has received little attention. With the increasing density of work, ever higher demands and increasing burdens due to digital availability, mental health has also been the focus of attention for a few years now. By 2018, German health insurers had reported an ever-increasing number of cases of mental illness. They are now the most common cause of early retirement and occupational disability in Germany and, with 15.2 percent, are still the third most common cause of absenteeism. Poor leadership, a lack of conflict, error and criticism culture are sooner or later a business-critical issue that can endanger the continued existence of the organization. Above all, people can be overloaded to the point of burnout if they are only supposed to function on the factual level during change processes and are not heard. Fears, emotions and internal and external conflicts are still far too rarely discussed.

Looking behind the façade and promoting healthy cooperation

Unlike psychotherapists, I/O psychologists are not clinicians but analyze an organization and its actors at all hierarchical levels from a socio-psychological perspective. They look behind the façade of a company and analyze social relationships and interactions. How do individual people feel when, for example, they constantly experience themselves in change situations as a result of digitalization? To what extent do the demands and reality of a company’s social dealings soften and how does this affect the perception and behavior of employees? How does a manager lead and communicate? Are emotional needs addressed in communication in addition to factual issues, especially in change situations? And how does a company deal with conflicts, mistakes, and fears? Does a manager then also address the relationship levels between conflict parties and works up disturbed relationships in such a way that it can then continue on a healthy working level? I/O psychologists need a pronounced communicative and social competence. They must ask the right questions and above all be able to listen. They must moderate conversations and be emphatic and sympathetic to people of all hierarchies. Above all, they must impart knowledge and methods on how healthy cooperation in companies, departments or teams should and can be successful.

High qualification requirements for I/O psychologists

Ambitious providers recruit only graduates of a diploma or master’s degree course in psychology. In Germany, the subject has a numerus clause of 1.0. Other courses of study in psychology often do not fulfill the specialist and methodological knowledge that is ideally available. One recognizes quality providers by the fact that they submit enterprises no run-of-the-mill-offers, instead these can clarify beforehand, where the pain points are, what the enterprise needs and expects as purposeful solutions. Even though there are only a few legal requirements for I/O psychologists, large providers also attach great importance to the qualification of their colleagues along with the methodological and technical developments in corporate psychology research and practice.

Interdisciplinary cooperation

In 2013, the German legislator also recognized that mental health is a high value in a modern, synchronized and digitalized working world with increasingly older employees. It, therefore, included a guideline in the Occupational Health and Safety Act that all employers, regardless of the size of their company, must regularly carry out a risk analysis of psychological stress at the workplace. However, the guidelines for the implementation of the “Joint German Occupational Safety and Health Strategy” do not stipulate that such risk analysis must be prepared by psychologists. For example, at AMD TÜV it has been agreed that the psychologists will be in charge of the process, will advise on the methodology and will play a key role in supporting communication. Occupational physicians and safety specialists must also be involved. The cooperation in prevention teams with occupational medicine, occupational health and safety, occupational health promotion and occupational integration management is necessary in order to deal with the complex issues relating to occupational health and safety in companies.

TÜVRheinland_Resiliencecheck_OccupationalHealth

In 48 hours to more employee health

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), stress is one of the greatest health threats of the 21st century. It can hit anyone and cause massive mental and physical problems. For this reason alone, employers should find the right way to deal with stress in the workplace early on and consistently, and support employees as needed. Find out how well this works.

Psychological stress at the workplace is increasing. As a result, the health insurance funds in Germany alone have been recording a steady increase in stress-related sick leave for years. Of about 15 days of absence per capita and year, an average of 2.5 days are currently spent on psychological complaints. According to a recent survey, one in five workers across Europe is under stress every day and one in three is thinking about moving to a less stressful job.

Stress costs the economy billions

Mental illnesses also cost the economy dearly. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the economic costs of mental illness in the European Union (EU) alone amount to around 600 billion Euros annually. Especially since many countries now even prescribe the risk assessment of psychological stress at the workplace by law. Workplace health management therefore pays off for companies in every respect. But not every professional requirement is detrimental to health. Thus, stress in moderation can also encourage higher performance, promote personal development and give positive impulses for the quality of life and work. It is therefore crucial for companies to recognize at an early stage what strains have negative impacts on the workforce and its motivation.

Facts decide

But how can well-founded insights be gained beyond the subjective statements of employees? With the Resilience Check, TÜV Rheinland for the first time offers a program that objectifies the subjectively felt physical and mental stress of employees on the basis of reliable measured values – from heart health to sleep quality and recovery to general fitness. The resilience check provides companies with an instrument for realistically assessing the physical effects of stress on the workforce – and initiating long-term, needs-based preventive measures. This makes it a useful addition to risk assessment and becomes a valuable element of occupational health and safety and health management.

Determine individual stress factors

On the one hand, the individual employee benefits. After the online questionnaire on the physical condition (e.g. high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, sleep quality) and psychological condition (work-related behavior and experience pattern) in the context of their work has been completed, a chest strap measurement is carried out. On two ideal working days, different vital data on heart health, sleep quality, stress and physical activity are measured using a sensor that is attached to the skin like a plaster under the breast. A personal health report is automatically delivered at the end of the measurement. On the other hand, the company receives an anonymous company report for the targeted planning of company prevention measures: With simple anonymized comparison values across e.g. departments or locations, focal points for action are prioritized.

A classic win-win situation: employees learn which stress factors particularly motivate or burden them, employers get a holistic picture of the state of health of their own workforce – and can then focus on health prevention. For example, by realigning work processes, planning additional resources or designing offers for occupational health prevention in a target-group-specific manner, whether health advice, planning measures or introducing a holistic occupational health management system. Learn more about how you can optimize your workplace health management:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/1667794604145327885 (German only)

 

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myths of leadership_svengrote_tüvrheinland

7 Myths of leadership – that you should forget

In the context of digital transformation, how can and how should managers and executives ensure with qualified leadership that teams and individual employees remain healthy, qualified and motivated – despite the stress brought on them by change and dynamic working conditions? For example, first of all be self-critical: After all, if things don’t run smoothly in the company, productivity and innovation rates fall short of expectations and the company falls steadily behind in the market, this can be caused by the coexistence of traditional and modern management models. Some executives like to cling to outdated models of staff management – and at the same time hope to somehow manage to survive the change. Dr. Sven Grote, who also talked about the TÜV Rheinland dialog “Human and health”, addresses the most important management myths.Read More