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TÜV Rheinland Academy Digital Competence

How TÜV Rheinland Academy empowers digital competence

How do I move safely on the net? How do I recognize a fake profile? How do I judge online communication, how do I distinguish real news from fake news? What is a Meme? Where do I reveal too much of my private life and become a potential victim of identity theft? These are all questions of digital literacy to which children and young people should have an answer. This makes them strong and resistant to the dangers of the internet and prepares them for their professional future. So far, however, digital competence is neither a teaching subject nor part of teacher training in Germany. TÜV Rheinland Academy in Germany is changing this – for example as a partner of DigiCamps. The resonance is unprecedented and has in the meantime the format of a movement, better said in the net speech: DigiCamps goes viral. The aim is to enable the specialists and managers of tomorrow to develop safely and healthily and to start here as early as possible: with schools and teachers.

2017 was the start of “DigiCamps – Life in Balance.” Since then, a republic-wide series has emerged that provides students, teachers, and parents with orientation on the World Wide Web. To provide didactically and pedagogically valuable information about the opportunities and risks of using the internet the social enterprise BG 3000 Service GmbH, the health insurance BARMER and TÜV Rheinland Academy Germany developed smart camps, teacher camps, trainee camps, and DigiCamps. Barmer is sponsoring the initiative, TÜV Rheinland Academy is one of the leading competence developers on board as part of the digital transformation. The primary motivation is that the acquisition of digital competence has to start early. Today and even more in the future, it belongs to the essential teaching contents such as reading, writing, and arithmetic. Parents and teachers must not be left alone with this task.

Optimizing the digital self and avoiding digital stress

A DigiCamp lasts three days and has a modular structure. It is aimed at students, mainly middle school students, teachers, and parents. In interactive workshops, they learn the safe and above all good use of digital media. The trainer teams consist of media educators, psychologists, nutrition and fitness experts and, above all, well-known social media influencers. Together, the participants deal with all facets of internet use. Questions about the functioning of Snapchat, Instagram, etc. are dealt with. The participants deal with the individual challenge of how to optimize their online self. They learn how to recognize addictive behavior in themselves and others and how to handle digital stress. By dealing with their usage patterns and without moral forefinger, the DigiCamps provide recommendations and orientation. Social media and mobile devices are part of life, but good use of them needs to be learned.

Hackers create “aha” effects

The DigiCamps start with impressive demonstrations that IT security specialists prepare according to age. With live hacking experiments, adults and teenagers will experience how quickly an e-mail account with weak passwords can be hacked. They are amazed when they experience the consequences of a travel ticket posted on Facebook and a thumbs up. A thumb recorded with an ordinary smartphone camera can be used to manipulate the fingerprint sensor on a mobile device. These “aha” effects about an unconsidered posting of personal information have a healing effect. Those who have participated in the DigiCamp will at least question their user behavior and ultimately change it.

Influencers clarify

Educating in the best sense of the word is also done by social media giants at the DigiCamps, who have tens of thousands of subscribers on Instagram or YouTube. For example, Irina Engelke (287,000 followers) and Laura Grosch (132,000 followers) report on their Instagram channels during the DigiCamps. Sebastian Meichsner from Bullshit TV, among others, will talk about their YouTube projects with over 1.8 million followers.

Influencers of this kind, who are still in adolescence themselves, inform their peers about the mechanisms of action of these popular platforms. In the workshops, they appeal to their practical experience to use their minds in dealing with social media. Under their guidance and accompanied by pedagogues, the participants on the second and third day create their videos, create blogs, or other digital formats. They also deal with conditions of production and reception. In this way, children and young people learn playfully and concretely how to deal responsibly with these media.

Great interest in the format also from third parties

By the end of 2019, DigiCamps should have taken place in at least 100 schools. The objective of the project is that the teaching staff will then be able to offer their own teaching formats for digital competence in their schools with the extensive teaching materials of the initiative. In the meantime, word of success has spread, and the unique role played by TÜV Rheinland Academy in the interdisciplinary project has become known. Further organizations in Germany and Switzerland are interested in the realization of DigiCamps at schools and with education providers.

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7 Myths of leadership – that you should forget

In the context of digital transformation, how can and how should managers and executives ensure with qualified leadership that teams and individual employees remain healthy, qualified and motivated – despite the stress brought on them by change and dynamic working conditions? For example, first of all be self-critical: After all, if things don’t run smoothly in the company, productivity and innovation rates fall short of expectations and the company falls steadily behind in the market, this can be caused by the coexistence of traditional and modern management models. Some executives like to cling to outdated models of staff management – and at the same time hope to somehow manage to survive the change. Dr. Sven Grote, who also talked about the TÜV Rheinland dialog “Human and health”, addresses the most important management myths.Read More

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The Skills Revolution – Hello Automation, Goodbye Workers?

What does the future hold for automation? One thing is certain: We’ll have to learn new skills. Skills to deal with change, for jobs we don’t even have an idea about today. The Manpower Group, the world’s largest employment services provider, asked 18,000 employers in 43 countries from 6 industrial sectors what these skills could be, what activities we would have to perform and what the working world could look like in the near future. This means that the current technology can automate up to 45 percent of the tasks for which people are paid every day. At the same time, we have long since adapted to this development in the job market – chatbots, automatic customer service on the phone, word processing programs and even personal assistants are nothing new. The difference now is that the life cycle of skills is shorter than ever and changes are taking place on an unprecedented scale. The impact may be hyperinflated today, but as the cost and complexity of implementing technology decreases, the speed will continue to accelerate.

And yet: New technologies can be expensive and require people with expertise. Employers are therefore reluctant to say “hello automation, goodbye workers” with full vigor. Most employers expect a net gain for employees through automation and adaptation to digitization. 83 percent intend to maintain or increase their headcount and train their employees over the next two years. Only 12 percent of employers plan to reduce the number of employees due to automation. What does this look like in your company? Do you rely more on new technologies or on loyal employees who are willing to take further training?

Employability = willingness to learn new things

We can assume that the value we place on different abilities will soon change. Digitization and the growth of skilled labor offer opportunities as long as organizations and individuals are prepared to embrace this change in values. New technologies will replace both cognitive and manual routine tasks, allowing people to assume more fulfilling roles and leave routine tasks to an algorithm. Creativity, emotional intelligence and cognitive flexibility are skills that harness human potential and enable humans to complement rather than be replaced by robots. People will increasingly realize that they need to move into new areas and diversify. Openness for skill acquisition, flexibility and the ability to learn will be decisive.

For people, employability – the ability to get and keep a desired job – no longer depends on what they can already do, but on their willingness to learn new things they don’t yet know about. The companies that can combine the right combination of people, skills and technology are the ones that will persevere and win. Take a look at your corporate structure: Who can do what and to what extent have you implemented new technical solutions? Is there potential for improvement in one or the other area?

Know-how transfer from person to person

The future of work requires different skills and employers need to focus more than ever on retraining and education to cope with the current talent shortage and anticipate tomorrow’s challenges. Almost three quarters invest in internal training to keep their qualifications up to date. 44 percent hire additional skilled workers instead of replacing them, and more than a third persuade third parties or contractors to transfer expertise to their own employees. We should not underestimate the value of the human connection. The transformation of work in the age of machines does not have to be a struggle between man and robot.

Which talents do you promote in your company?

The Manpower Group has proclaimed the “Skills Revolution”. It requires a new mindset both for employers who are trying to develop a workforce with the right skills and for people who want to advance their careers. Educational initiatives to strengthen the talent pipeline are important, but not the only answer and may take many years to bear fruit. Companies must play a role to improve people’s lives and be an important part of the solution. Now is the time for managers and individuals to become aware of their responsibilities and be responsive. Find out about the opportunities to promote talent and develop new skills in your company. TÜV Rheinland Academy, for example, can help you with this. We support you with tried and tested solutions for people in the workplace and in their professional environment. Contact us and we will discuss together which forms and methods can best be used in your company.

More information is available at: https://www.tuv.com/